Saturday, December 22, 2012

Battle of Great Cane Brake, SC

December 22nd, 1775
While those engaged at Ninety-Six were negotiating a truce, Col. Richard Richardson was already on its way into the upcountry to arrest the leaders of the Loyalist party. Richardson decided that his mission was not affected by the truce signed at Ninety-Six and proceeded to carry out his instructions.
Receiving intelligence that the most active leaders of the opposition were encamped on Cherokee land, he dispatched a force under Colonel William Thomson (SC 3rd Regiment of Rangers), which surprised the Loyalists on the morning of December 22 and defeated them in the Battle of Great Cane Brake. Most of the Loyalist band were captured and sent back to face charges of sedition in Charleston. However, Patrick Cunningham and Col. Joseph Robinson escaped to the Cherokee Nation.
The Great Cane Brake was located on the Reedy River in the southern portion of present Greenville County, The only location Colonel Richardson gives us is that the site was a long march of nearly twenty-five miles from his camp at Holhngsworth's Mill on Raborn's Creek (in present-day Laurens County, and the modern spelling is Rabon Creek). Luxuriant growths of cane were quite common in river valleys of the upcountry before the US Revolution.December 22nd, 1775
 
"While those engaged at Ninety-Six, South Carolina, were negotiating a truce, Patriot Col. Richard Richardson was already on its way into the upcountry to arrest the leaders of the Loyalist party. Richardson decided that his mission was not affected by the truce signed at Ninety-Six and proceeded to carry out his instructions.
 
"Receiving intelligence that the most active leaders of the opposition were encamped on Cherokee land, he dispatched a force under Colonel William Thomson (SC 3rd Regiment of Rangers), which surprised the Loyalists on the morning of December 22 and defeated them in the Battle of Great Cane Brake. Most of the Loyalist band were captured and sent back to face charges of sedition in Charleston. However, Patrick Cunningham and Col. Joseph Robinson escaped to the Cherokee Nation.
 
"The Great Cane Brake was located on the Reedy River in the southern portion of present Greenville County, South Carolina. The only location Colonel Richardson gives us is that the site was a long march of nearly twenty-five miles from his camp at Hollingsworth's Mill on Raborn's Creek (in present-day Laurens County, and the modern spelling is Rabon Creek). Luxuriant growths of cane were quite common in river valleys of the upcountry before the US Revolution."